Vol 16, No 4 (2016)

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Vol. 16, No 4 (2016)

Editor: dr Tomasz Rólczyński
Editor-in-chief: Prof. Johannes Platje

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Editorial pag: PDF download >>

 

 

 

 


Vol. 16, No 4 (2016), page 5

A fragility approach to campus sustainability – methodological explorations

Author: Johannes Platje

Article: PDF download >>

ABSTRACT:

Aim: Often, the approach towards entering a path of sustainable development is that intervention needs to take place. This may lead to unwanted side effects. This paper presents the basis for explorative research on campus sustainability. The aim is to create a basis for developing a methodology for identifying fragilities, threats to organizational viability and sustainable development of the external environment.

Design / Research methods: The ideas presented in this paper were developed through literature study and discussed during three explorative research workshops organized in May and June 2016 at the WSB University in Wrocław (Poland), the University of Sonora (Hermosillo, Mexico) and Siauliai University (Lithuania). The ideas developed are the basis for future research on the issue.

Conclusions / findings: Although more elements are included in the survey, representing elements of organizational viability and mental models directing the path of change. The survey presented and discussed in reflection papers in this volume will be the base for further research on how to improve campus sustainability by eliminating unsustainabilities.

Originality / value of the article: While the traditional approach towards campus sustainability is what action should be undertaken in order to support this aim, in this paper focus is on what not to do. It can be expected that this approach leads to less undesired side-effects than an interventionist approach.

Keywords: campus  sustainability, sustainability  management,  fragility, methodology

JEL: Q01, B40, I23


Vol.16, No 4 (2016), page 19

The seductive logic of subtractive sustainability: reflections on sustainable socio-economic development

Author: Ynte K. Van Dam

Article: PDF download >>

ABSTRACT:

Aim: To discuss the drivers and impediments sustainability of social systems.

Design / Research methods: Analysis of and reflections on the discussions on campus antifragility during the 4th  international conference on efficiency, sustainable business and sustainable economic development, hosted by WSB Wroclaw on May 13th 2016.

Conclusions / findings: (1) Lack of sustainability results from organisational culture or dominant logic rather than from primary activities; (2) Disequilibrium in organisational culture reflects a lack of congruence between formal and informal institutions; (3) Conflict between informal and formal institutions is a driver of change, unless the formal institutions are enforced as a core cultural value; (4) Sustainability and sustainable development in a turbulent environment should aim for organisational and cultural diversity.

Originality / value of the article:This discussion note shows that a good metaphor can generate new insights. Viewed in terms of organisational viability and antifragility it is not what is done, but how it is done that determines the sustainability of an organisation. This implies that the ends never justify the means. The discussion note shows that sustainable development requires a critical reflection on the formal institutions and governance systems that determine these means. Likewise sustainable marketing requires a critical reflection on market institutions.

Keywords: Diversity,  institutions, organisational  culture,  sustainable development

JEL: B52, M14, Q01


Vol.16, No 4 (2016), page 31

Reflection on the Sustainability and Multilevel Antifragility Workshop

Author: David N Berger

Article: PDF download >>

ABSTRACT:

Aim: The aim of this article is to provide a brief reflection on the campus sustainability workshop that was held on May 13th, 2016 at the WSB University in Wroclaw. The topic of sustainability, and identifying critical threats to sustainability at the institutional level and beyond is of major concern.

Design / Research methods: This reflection relies on a critical review of the discussion and materials presented during the workshop, and the opinion of the author. The observation and participation of the author and fellow participants played a crucial role in shaping the reflection.

Conclusions / findings: Firstly, the conclusion drawn is that the methodology used by the host should be more clearly specified, and the questions should be focused and separated, in order to properly research them. Secondly, given the data that was available, that the study of fragilization in this context should focus on Safe to Fail, instead of Fail Safe approaches, to prevent catastrophic failure events.

Originality / value of the article: The value of this reflection lies in the primary research interest, however, institutions may benefit from the analysis and opinions suggested. Without properly redesigning the study methodology to be more specific, the value of this research in its current form is limited, this author looks forward to the future work on the topic.

Keywords: campus  sustainability,  sustainability management, fragility, antifragility, methodology

JEL: Q01, B40, I23


Vol.16, No 4 (2016), page 37

Reflections on the questionnaire at the workshops: Methodology for assessing the cam-pus sustainability from the perspective of multi-level antifragility

Author: Robert Daniel Poskart

Article: PDF download >>

ABSTRACT:

Aim: The author provides a critical reflection of the questionnaire discussed at the workshop “Methodology for assessing the campus sustainability from the perspective of multi-level antifragility” held on Friday 13 May 2016 at the WSB University in Wrocław. The aim is to make a general diagnosis of the current situation in higher education in Poland, and to propose a direction of change than can enable its survival and improve its quality.

Design / Research methods: In the article, the author gives his personal reflections regarding the research questionnaire discussed at the workshop “Methodology for assessing the campus sustainability from the perspective of multi-level antifragility” in the context of the viability of higher education in Poland.

Conclusions / findings: The author selected, in his opinion, the most important elements of the questionnaire discussed at the research workshop. The main conclusion is that significant changes seem to be necessary due to the dynamic developments in the external environment, in particular the declining number of students resulting from the deepening demographic decline.

Originality / value of the article: The article provides critical feedback on an innovative approach towards research on campus sustainability.

Keywords: higher  education,  demographic decline, external environment

JEL: I23, J11


Vol.16, No 4 (2016), page 45

A simple model for preventing campus unsustainability

Author: Tadas Radavičius

Article: PDF download >>

ABSTRACT:

Aim: The author presents his reflections on the theories and survey discussed at the workshop on “Methodology for assessing the campus sustainability from the perspective of multi-level antifragility” held in Wrocław (Poland) in May 2016. The reflections concern indicators which are relevant to prevent unsustainability of the development of a university as well as its stakeholders. Furthermore, a simple model for assessing the potential for eliminating threats regarding campus sustainability is presented

Design / Research methods: The author reflects on the theories and survey, based on his experience as a student of while being a volunteer teacher for almost two months in Ukraine, among other things providing seminars for students. The ideas were further developed during the workshop on campus sustainability at WSB University in Wrocław (Poland) on 13 May 2016.

Conclusions / findings: Many people want to make changes at universities in order to support campus sustainability. This paper shows that changes towards eliminating obstacles not always have a positive impact. As there are many factors determining University viability, when changing something, the non-reversible impacts of a change in the respective indicator on other indicators need to be considered. While this may not be enough to conclude whether a change, as a whole, is positive or not, it helps to define different scenarios of change.

Originality / value of the article:A simple model for initial assessment of po tential for eliminating threats regarding campus sustainability is presented. This simple models enables the decision whether quick changes can be made, or whether deeper research is needed.

Keywords: campus sustainability, sustainability management, fragility, antifragility, methodology

JEL: Q01, B40, I23


Vol.16, No 4 (2016), page 53

Reflections on methodology for assessing campus sustainability from a Turkish perspective

Author: Serhat Basak

Article: PDF download >>

ABSTRACT:

Aim: The author provides a critical reflection of the questionnaire discussed at the workshop “Methodology for assessing the campus sustainability from the perspective of multi-level antifragility” held on Friday 13 May at the WSB University in Wrocław. The author reflects from the background of his experience in Turkey.

Design / Research methods: The author provides his own reflections and opinions, based on the discussions at the workshop.

Conclusions / findings: It is very difficult to create a set of indicators making campus sustainability internationally comparable, as well as finding proper sources of information. A starting point in creating such indicators may be mistakes threatening organizational viability and external sustainability

Originality / value of the article: The article provides critical feedback on an innovative approach towards research on campus sustainability.

Keywords: campus sustainability, sustainability management, fragility, antifragility, methodology

JEL: Q01, B40, I23


Vol.16, No 4 (2016), page 57

Reflections on developing indicators for campus sustainability from a fragility perspective

Author: Monika Paradowska, Santa Bukauskaitė, Gytys Rimkus, Alexander Heller, Akim Sharapov, Nika Magradze, Joost Platje

Article: PDF download >>

ABSTRACT:

Aim: Provide a summary of the discussion at the workshop on “Methodology for assessing the campus sustainability from the perspective of multi-level antifragility” held on Friday 13 May at the WSB University in Wrocław, as well as reflection notes each of the participant wrote after the workshop. The paper shows the outcome of the process of interaction and reflections of the authors regarding the methodology of assessing campus sustainability using a fragility approach.

Design / Research methods: This article contains feedback based on the experience and ideas from students from Georgia, Germany, Kazakhstan and Lithuania. Discussion took place during the workshop in focus groups. Afterwards, a discussion took place among all participating students and lecturers. After the workshop, the authors wrote individual feedback notes. These are summarized in this paper.

Conclusions / findings: Although there are promising element that can be developed into a framework of assessing campus sustainability from a fragility perspective, many challenges appear. In particular challenges in defining unambiguous indicators as well as finding proper sources of information were identified.

Originality / value of the article: The article provides critical feedback on an innovative approach towards research on campus sustainability.

Keywords: campus  sustainability,  sustainability management, fragility, antifragility, methodology

JEL: Q01, B40, I23


Vol.16, No 4 (2016), page 63

Reflections on methods for assessing campus sustainability from a Lithuanian perspective

Author: Diana Cibulskiene, Alina Gogitidze, Vladimir Kuvshinov, Laura Malyševa, Kornelija Raišytė, Sofya Sharipko, Joost Platje

Article: PDF download >>

ABSTRACT:

Aim: Provide a summary of the discussion of focus group 1 at the workshop on “Methodology for assessing the campus sustainability from the perspective of multi-level antifragility” held in June 2016 at Siauliai University (Lithuania), as well as reflection notes each of the participant wrote after the workshop. The paper shows the outcome of the process of interaction and reflections of the authors.

Design / Research methods:This article contains feedback based on the experience and ideas from third year students of sustainable business from the University of Siauliai (Lithuania). Discussion took place during the workshop in focus groups. Afterwards, a discussion took place among all participating students and lecturers. After the workshop, the authors wrote individual feedback notes. These are summarized in this paper.

Conclusions / findings: Students may provide limited information on university viability and sustainability of the university’s external environment due to lack of information on many indicators. Many indicators on which no information was available were considered to be irrelevant, being an example of the principle “what we do not see, does not count.”

Originality / value of the article: The article provides critical feedback on an innovative approach towards research on campus sustainability.

Keywords: campus sustainability, sustainability management, fragility, antifragility, methodology

JEL: Q01, B40, I23


Vol.16, No 4 (2016), page 67

Reflections on methodology for and the importance of indicators for campus sustainability – a Lithuanian case study

Author: Diana Cibulskiene, Vėjūnė Laurinavičiūtė, Gaivilė Nemeišytė, Renata Osockyte, Raimunda Urbelytė, Žygimantas Kupstys, Eivydo Čuluunpurevas, Joost Platje

Article: PDF download >>

ABSTRACT:

Aim: Provide a summary of the discussion of focus group 2 at the workshop on “Methodology for assessing the campus sustainability from the perspective of multi-level antifragility” held in June 2016 at Siauliai University (Lithuania), as well as reflection notes each of the participant wrote after the workshop. The paper shows the outcome of the process of interaction and reflections of the authors.

Design / Research methods:This article contains feedback based on the experience and ideas from third year students from sustainable business from the University of Siauliai (Lithuania). Discussion took place during the workshop in focus groups. Afterwards, a discussion took place among all participating students and lecturers. After the workshop, the authors wrote individual feedback notes. These are summarized in this paper.

Conclusions / findings: When using a wider set of indicators of campus sustainability showing different types of fragilities, different stakeholders need to be used as a source of information. The reason is that when not possessing information on a certain aspect, as was confirmed by this focus group, an indicator tends to be considered irrelevant. A conclusion that should be treated with care is that indicators of lying and cheating, honesty, as well as indicators of mistakes may be a good starting point for creating indicators of campus sustainability focusing at threats for organizational viability and sustainability of the university’s external environment.

Originality / value of the article: The article provides critical feedback on an innovative approach towards research on campus sustainability.

Keywords: campus sustainability, sustainability management, fragility, antifragility, methodology

JEL: Q01, B40, I23


Vol.16, No 4 (2016), page 73

Reflections about the Wroclaw International Workshop on Campus Sustainability

Author: David Slim Zepeda Quintana, Luis Eduardo Velazquez Contreras

Article: PDF download >>

ABSTRACT:

Aim: This paper aims to describe experiences and remarks regarding The International Workshops on Campus Sustainability held on Wroclaw, Poland in May 2016 and in Hermosillo, México in June 2016. The objective of these workshops was to discuss ideas for explorative research on campus sustainability and identify fragilities and weaknesses in higher education institutions, which can lead to irreversible losses.

Design / Research methods: The findings presented in this paper were developed through two structured questionnaires used as a data collection instrument as well as discussion during both workshops. In total 51 participants, students, professors and administrative staff of different universities around the world, took part in the discussions

Conclusions / findings: It is intended to create a new set of indicators of fragility threatening campus viability and sustainable development in general, which may contribute to a path towards sustainable development. Corruption, lack of access to information, lack of knowledge, lack of proper education for students, lack of understanding of sustainable development and hiring bad teachers were perceived as relevant indicators for the identification of fragilities within the university. In this paper, the discrepancy of perspectives among professors, students, and administrative staff is stressed.

Originality / value of the article: The identification of weaknesses and fragilities within higher education institutes may contribute to create more resilient environments and may enable the transition to sustainable development.

Keywords: sustainable  development, campus sustainability, fragility

JEL: Q01, I23, D29


Vol.16, No 4 (2016), page 79

Knowledge and Governance: a reflection of sustainability from campus to industry

Author: Vania Sarahid Flores Borboa

Article: PDF download >>

ABSTRACT:

Aim: The author provides a critical reflection of the questionnaire discussed at the workshop “Methodology for assessing the campus sustainability from the perspective of multi-level antifragility” held in June 2016 at the University of Sonora (Hermosillo, Mexico). This paper poses a reflection of how the sustainability perspective in high level education institutions could define the stage of change of alumni and therefore has an influence on sustainability issues of local companies.

Design / Research methods: In the article, the author applies ideas and reflections regarding the research questionnaire discussed at the workshop “Methodology for assessing the campus sustainability from the perspective of multi-level antifragility” held in June 2016 at the University of Sonora (Hermosillo, Mexico) to sustainability issues in local companies.

Conclusions / findings:Universities have great responsibility in preparing students for applying principles of sustainability into business practice. In particular regarding the complexity of the world, where knowledge can be applied in a quickly changing environment. University staff and students can have a completely different view on the existence of different fragilities.

Originality / value of the article: The article provides critical feedback on an innovative approach towards research on campus sustainability in the context of application to business practice.

Keywords: ustainability,  Knowledge, Governance, Stage of Change, perception.

JEL: Q01, B40, I23